Abstract

I have found that poetry provides not only a space for the articulation of voice, but also a space for vocal play. Unlike spaces containing singular, masterful voices, poetic space can be poly-vocal. Much more than the voice of a critical essay, the voices of poems can dream, argue, create, question, collide, sometimes all at the same time, in new and relevant ways. While some poems function with linearity and mastery-they make arguments and stick to them--others employ a more sensing, associative language. Some navigate the space between such states, or take on both at the same time, and still others combine a multiplicity of voices, becoming a mess, but a productive one.

Disciplines

English Language and Literature