Event Title

Adapting the Mandated Math Curriculum in an Engaging Way to Best Promote Students' Learning

Graduation Year

2013

Location

Lower Level, Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

Description

Prior research suggests teachers should be more prepared to engage students in mathematics. Engaging students in mathematics can be a difficult task for teachers, especially when they need to adapt to and incorporate the Common Core State Standards. Games and other engaging and content-based activities can be useful in increasing students’ interest in and understanding of mathematical concepts. This paper examines the usefulness of such activities and how they fit into the Common Core curriculum. This study was completed using a qualitative self-study approach and included varying data collection methods, including field notes, SmartNotebook activities, and informal student feedback. Findings indicate that activities with specific, content-based objectives can be used to increase students’ motivation and thus, increase their comprehension of the topics. Additionally, non-word based activities can also be helpful for students with low reading proficiency.

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Apr 20th, 9:00 AM Apr 20th, 10:00 AM

Adapting the Mandated Math Curriculum in an Engaging Way to Best Promote Students' Learning

Lower Level, Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Prior research suggests teachers should be more prepared to engage students in mathematics. Engaging students in mathematics can be a difficult task for teachers, especially when they need to adapt to and incorporate the Common Core State Standards. Games and other engaging and content-based activities can be useful in increasing students’ interest in and understanding of mathematical concepts. This paper examines the usefulness of such activities and how they fit into the Common Core curriculum. This study was completed using a qualitative self-study approach and included varying data collection methods, including field notes, SmartNotebook activities, and informal student feedback. Findings indicate that activities with specific, content-based objectives can be used to increase students’ motivation and thus, increase their comprehension of the topics. Additionally, non-word based activities can also be helpful for students with low reading proficiency.