Event Title

Autobiographical Voice and Resistance in Maryse Condé’s Le cœur à rire et à pleurer: Dynamics of Race, Gender, and Écriture Féminine

Graduation Year

2013

Location

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 11:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 12:00 PM

Description

As a collection of autobiographical short stories or vignettes, Le cœur à rire et à pleurer (Tales From the Heart: True Stories From my Childhood, 1999) represents Guadeloupean author Maryse Condé's (1937 - ) interaction with and dismissal of multiple forms of oppression. As Condé makes use of storytelling and her childhood memories to explore issues of her identity and societal role, her writing transforms into a self-declaration of social change and equality. This paper aims to identify and examine Conde's denial of constructs of Otherness, in her persistent effort to resist the cycle of oppression and to dismiss the generational pressures to conform to patriarchal and colonial values. Informed by psychoanalytic theory and feminist criticism, Condé adapts her own écriture féminine (women’s writing) to assert the significance of women’s voices as tools in breaking the silence of abjection and dismantling hierarchical notions of power.

Comments

An extended treatment of this topic was awarded University Honors and may be found online. Ms. Klingele's work was also selected to be published in CrissCross, a journal for interdisciplinary student research.

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Apr 20th, 11:00 AM Apr 20th, 12:00 PM

Autobiographical Voice and Resistance in Maryse Condé’s Le cœur à rire et à pleurer: Dynamics of Race, Gender, and Écriture Féminine

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

As a collection of autobiographical short stories or vignettes, Le cœur à rire et à pleurer (Tales From the Heart: True Stories From my Childhood, 1999) represents Guadeloupean author Maryse Condé's (1937 - ) interaction with and dismissal of multiple forms of oppression. As Condé makes use of storytelling and her childhood memories to explore issues of her identity and societal role, her writing transforms into a self-declaration of social change and equality. This paper aims to identify and examine Conde's denial of constructs of Otherness, in her persistent effort to resist the cycle of oppression and to dismiss the generational pressures to conform to patriarchal and colonial values. Informed by psychoanalytic theory and feminist criticism, Condé adapts her own écriture féminine (women’s writing) to assert the significance of women’s voices as tools in breaking the silence of abjection and dismantling hierarchical notions of power.