Event Title

Genome Annotation of a Bacteriophage of Rhodobacter Capsulatus Isolated from Central Illinois Water

Graduation Year

2013

Location

Atrium, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

Description

Two bacteriophages that infect Rhodobacter capsulatus, Saxon and Spartan, were isolated from water in the Bloomington/Normal, IL area. After purification of the phages, genomic DNA from the phages was sent to the University of Pittsburgh to be sequenced. In order to annotate the two genomes, the software packages DNA Master, HHpred, Glimmer, and GeneMark were utilized to analyze and characterize the coding sequence, gene number, and protein functions. Spartan’s genome consists of 43,964 base pairs and 62 genes and Saxon’s genome is composed of 36,096 base pairs and 48 genes. Through genomic analysis of Spartan, it was concluded that many gene functions were similar to Burkholderia and Pseudemonas phages. However, most gene functions have yet to be identified. The completed annotation of the genome will be submitted to the GenBank database.

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Apr 20th, 9:00 AM Apr 20th, 10:00 AM

Genome Annotation of a Bacteriophage of Rhodobacter Capsulatus Isolated from Central Illinois Water

Atrium, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Two bacteriophages that infect Rhodobacter capsulatus, Saxon and Spartan, were isolated from water in the Bloomington/Normal, IL area. After purification of the phages, genomic DNA from the phages was sent to the University of Pittsburgh to be sequenced. In order to annotate the two genomes, the software packages DNA Master, HHpred, Glimmer, and GeneMark were utilized to analyze and characterize the coding sequence, gene number, and protein functions. Spartan’s genome consists of 43,964 base pairs and 62 genes and Saxon’s genome is composed of 36,096 base pairs and 48 genes. Through genomic analysis of Spartan, it was concluded that many gene functions were similar to Burkholderia and Pseudemonas phages. However, most gene functions have yet to be identified. The completed annotation of the genome will be submitted to the GenBank database.