Event Title

Cranial neural crest proliferation and incorporation into the developing jaw of redeye tetra (Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae)

Graduation Year

2014

Location

Atrium, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 2:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2013 3:00 PM

Description

Neural crest cells are a group of multivalent cell populations that are unique to vertebrates and give rise to many cell lineages including those in the craniofacial cartilage and bone. Our research examines the neural crest cell proliferation patterns in the developing jaw of the redeye tetra (Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae). Using BrdU, an analogue of thymine, we are able to detect proliferating cells at different points of development of the jaw elements, the ceratohyal and Meckel’s cartilage, in particular. We have observed a period of rapid proliferation of cranial neural crest cells prior to the cartilage formation followed by little or no cell division after cartilage formation. Our results show a rapid growth of the jaw as a result of continued incorporation of cells to the cartilage without continued division.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 2:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

Cranial neural crest proliferation and incorporation into the developing jaw of redeye tetra (Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae)

Atrium, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Neural crest cells are a group of multivalent cell populations that are unique to vertebrates and give rise to many cell lineages including those in the craniofacial cartilage and bone. Our research examines the neural crest cell proliferation patterns in the developing jaw of the redeye tetra (Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae). Using BrdU, an analogue of thymine, we are able to detect proliferating cells at different points of development of the jaw elements, the ceratohyal and Meckel’s cartilage, in particular. We have observed a period of rapid proliferation of cranial neural crest cells prior to the cartilage formation followed by little or no cell division after cartilage formation. Our results show a rapid growth of the jaw as a result of continued incorporation of cells to the cartilage without continued division.