Event Title

Diabetes as a Health Inequality Among Native Americans

Graduation Year

2014

Location

Room E106, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2014 11:00 AM

Description

Native American populations have a disproportionately higher rate of diabetes than any other population in the world. This research will examine the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about diabetes among Native Americans based on qualitative data collection among Native Americans in Illinois and on an Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Data was collected through survey responses that will help gain insight into what Native Americans know and believe about prevention and onset of diabetes, and the attitudes that shape their management of the disease. Personal interviews of Native Americans that live on a reservation were conducted to obtain an in depth understanding of the historical and cultural perception of diabetes. The findings of this research suggest that there is a disconnect between the unique set of beliefs and attitudes of Native Americans with diabetes that should be addressed in future education, treatment, and prevention programs.

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Apr 12th, 10:00 AM Apr 12th, 11:00 AM

Diabetes as a Health Inequality Among Native Americans

Room E106, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Native American populations have a disproportionately higher rate of diabetes than any other population in the world. This research will examine the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about diabetes among Native Americans based on qualitative data collection among Native Americans in Illinois and on an Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Data was collected through survey responses that will help gain insight into what Native Americans know and believe about prevention and onset of diabetes, and the attitudes that shape their management of the disease. Personal interviews of Native Americans that live on a reservation were conducted to obtain an in depth understanding of the historical and cultural perception of diabetes. The findings of this research suggest that there is a disconnect between the unique set of beliefs and attitudes of Native Americans with diabetes that should be addressed in future education, treatment, and prevention programs.