Event Title

A Minute New Species of Frog (Strabomantidae, Pristimantis) From a Cloud Forest in Southern Peru

Graduation Year

2015

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2014 10:00 AM

Description

The frog genus Pristimantis is distributed throughout Central and South America and contains 459 species, 123 of which are known to occur in Peru. Herein, we present a new species of Pristimantis from a cloud forest of the Rio Mantalo obtained at 2100 m above sea level in southern Peru. The new species is readily distinguished from other species in the genus by having a distinct red-orange groin, a smooth dorsum of brown and green coloration, and a short snout-vent length: 13.8–17.5 mm (n = 8, in adult males), and 20.1–22.2 mm (n = 2, in adult females). The new species is most similar to other small species of Pristimantis such as P. trachyblepharis and P. minutulus, but is discernible from both by having males with vocal slits, by its coloration, and by having a head wider than its body. Furthermore, the new species occurs at higher elevations (2100 m vs. 320–1250 m in P. trachyblepharis and 900–1200 m in P. minutulus).

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 10:00 AM

A Minute New Species of Frog (Strabomantidae, Pristimantis) From a Cloud Forest in Southern Peru

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

The frog genus Pristimantis is distributed throughout Central and South America and contains 459 species, 123 of which are known to occur in Peru. Herein, we present a new species of Pristimantis from a cloud forest of the Rio Mantalo obtained at 2100 m above sea level in southern Peru. The new species is readily distinguished from other species in the genus by having a distinct red-orange groin, a smooth dorsum of brown and green coloration, and a short snout-vent length: 13.8–17.5 mm (n = 8, in adult males), and 20.1–22.2 mm (n = 2, in adult females). The new species is most similar to other small species of Pristimantis such as P. trachyblepharis and P. minutulus, but is discernible from both by having males with vocal slits, by its coloration, and by having a head wider than its body. Furthermore, the new species occurs at higher elevations (2100 m vs. 320–1250 m in P. trachyblepharis and 900–1200 m in P. minutulus).