Event Title

A New Species of Pristimantis (Amphibia: Anura) From the Andes of Northern Peru

Graduation Year

2014

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2014 10:00 AM

Description

In Peru, frogs of the genus Pristimantis can be found from Amazonian lowland forests to high elevations in the Andes. Currently there are 459 species of Pristimantis known, 123 of which occur in Peru. Herein, we present and diagnose a new species of Pristimantis that was collected between 2974 and 2986 meters above sea level in a cloud forest in northern Peru. The new species is characterized by a snout-vent length of 34.2–37.3 mm (n = 3, all females), having Finger I longer than Finger II, having narrow finger tips and toe tips which lack circumferential grooves, lacking a tympanic annulus and tympanic membrane, having smooth skin on dorsum and venter, and having a yellow venter. The new species is most similar to members of the Pristimantis orestes Group and superficially similar to Lynchius flavomaculatus and Lynchius parkeri, but can easily be distinguished from those in various characters.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 10:00 AM

A New Species of Pristimantis (Amphibia: Anura) From the Andes of Northern Peru

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

In Peru, frogs of the genus Pristimantis can be found from Amazonian lowland forests to high elevations in the Andes. Currently there are 459 species of Pristimantis known, 123 of which occur in Peru. Herein, we present and diagnose a new species of Pristimantis that was collected between 2974 and 2986 meters above sea level in a cloud forest in northern Peru. The new species is characterized by a snout-vent length of 34.2–37.3 mm (n = 3, all females), having Finger I longer than Finger II, having narrow finger tips and toe tips which lack circumferential grooves, lacking a tympanic annulus and tympanic membrane, having smooth skin on dorsum and venter, and having a yellow venter. The new species is most similar to members of the Pristimantis orestes Group and superficially similar to Lynchius flavomaculatus and Lynchius parkeri, but can easily be distinguished from those in various characters.