Event Title

Effects of Education, Social Norms, and Green Identity: Behavioral Intent to Compost

Graduation Year

2015

Location

Room E103 Center for Natural Sciences

Start Date

18-4-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

18-4-2015 12:00 PM

Description

Psychological theory and research can be applied to offer insight into the cognitions, emotions, and behaviors of individuals’ environmentally relevant actions (Kazdin, 2009). Research on Community-Based Social Marketing (McKenzie-Mohr, 2011) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, 1991) provided a backbone for this research on students’ behavioral intent to compost at Illinois Wesleyan University. We assessed the impact of a brief video-based intervention (no information, information only, information plus social modeling) and pro-environmental identity on participants’ reactions to composting, specifically with respect to their attitudes, knowledge, perceptions of subjective norms, and behavioral intentions. Results indicated a main effect for the video intervention on subjective norms, behavioral intent, and knowledge, with participants in the information only and the information plus modeling conditions expressing more favorable reactions to composting than participants in the no information condition. Results have implications for techniques to further enhance composting on college campuses.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 18th, 11:00 AM Apr 18th, 12:00 PM

Effects of Education, Social Norms, and Green Identity: Behavioral Intent to Compost

Room E103 Center for Natural Sciences

Psychological theory and research can be applied to offer insight into the cognitions, emotions, and behaviors of individuals’ environmentally relevant actions (Kazdin, 2009). Research on Community-Based Social Marketing (McKenzie-Mohr, 2011) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, 1991) provided a backbone for this research on students’ behavioral intent to compost at Illinois Wesleyan University. We assessed the impact of a brief video-based intervention (no information, information only, information plus social modeling) and pro-environmental identity on participants’ reactions to composting, specifically with respect to their attitudes, knowledge, perceptions of subjective norms, and behavioral intentions. Results indicated a main effect for the video intervention on subjective norms, behavioral intent, and knowledge, with participants in the information only and the information plus modeling conditions expressing more favorable reactions to composting than participants in the no information condition. Results have implications for techniques to further enhance composting on college campuses.