Event Title

Family-Centered and Culturally Competent Care

Graduation Year

2015

Location

Room 102, State Farm Hall, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

18-4-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

18-4-2015 11:00 AM

Description

The purpose of this research synthesis is to explore the history and benefits of Family-Centered Care (FCC) and examine ways to facilitate family support for hospitalized children. FCC recognizes the psychosocial aspect in healthcare and maintains cultural competence. After conducting a three-step research approach, the grounded theory (Glasser & Strauss, 1966) was used to construct a framework for family-centered care and support. In successful FCC programs, data highlighted evidence of collaboration, honest communication, and cultural competence between staff and patients and their families (Institute For Family-Centered Care, Sep 2003). Acknowledging the benefits of FCC and collaborating with the child life specialists not only encompass the characteristics of culturally competent care, but also encourage family support within the hospital. Family support, as a result, enhances patient and family satisfaction, improves job satisfaction for the staff, and reduces healthcare costs on an institutional level (Bell, Johnson, Desai, and McLeod, 2009).

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Apr 18th, 10:00 AM Apr 18th, 11:00 AM

Family-Centered and Culturally Competent Care

Room 102, State Farm Hall, Illinois Wesleyan University

The purpose of this research synthesis is to explore the history and benefits of Family-Centered Care (FCC) and examine ways to facilitate family support for hospitalized children. FCC recognizes the psychosocial aspect in healthcare and maintains cultural competence. After conducting a three-step research approach, the grounded theory (Glasser & Strauss, 1966) was used to construct a framework for family-centered care and support. In successful FCC programs, data highlighted evidence of collaboration, honest communication, and cultural competence between staff and patients and their families (Institute For Family-Centered Care, Sep 2003). Acknowledging the benefits of FCC and collaborating with the child life specialists not only encompass the characteristics of culturally competent care, but also encourage family support within the hospital. Family support, as a result, enhances patient and family satisfaction, improves job satisfaction for the staff, and reduces healthcare costs on an institutional level (Bell, Johnson, Desai, and McLeod, 2009).