Event Title

Designing Optical Traps from the Bottom Up

Graduation Year

2017

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan Universtiy

Start Date

18-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

18-4-2015 10:00 AM

Description

Optical trapping is a highly dexterous method of manipulating and interrogating nano- and micro-components. It has wide range of application, from fundamental biology and biomedical studies at the cellular and subcellular levels, to studies of colloid and surface chemistry as well as controlled studies of aerosol chemistry relevant to climate change models, to fundamental physics connected to our understanding of the statistical mechanics of small systems, with opportunities of working towards the macroscopic quantum limit. To allow greater flexibility of design we have supplemented our lab’s use of a commercial fluorescence microscope with a new, open-source hardware microscope, of our own design, incorporating x-, y-, and z-motion of the sample stage, piezoelectric fine-scale control of microfluidic chambers within the workstation, Köhler illumination, a CMOS camera, automated tracking of microparticles, and provisions for alignment and calibration (in three dimensions) of optical traps. Here we describe our analysis of the two-dimensional potential well created by a single-beam laser gradient trap, and discuss algorithms for compensating for any factors that might otherwise limit the quality of the optical trap.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 18th, 9:00 AM Apr 18th, 10:00 AM

Designing Optical Traps from the Bottom Up

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan Universtiy

Optical trapping is a highly dexterous method of manipulating and interrogating nano- and micro-components. It has wide range of application, from fundamental biology and biomedical studies at the cellular and subcellular levels, to studies of colloid and surface chemistry as well as controlled studies of aerosol chemistry relevant to climate change models, to fundamental physics connected to our understanding of the statistical mechanics of small systems, with opportunities of working towards the macroscopic quantum limit. To allow greater flexibility of design we have supplemented our lab’s use of a commercial fluorescence microscope with a new, open-source hardware microscope, of our own design, incorporating x-, y-, and z-motion of the sample stage, piezoelectric fine-scale control of microfluidic chambers within the workstation, Köhler illumination, a CMOS camera, automated tracking of microparticles, and provisions for alignment and calibration (in three dimensions) of optical traps. Here we describe our analysis of the two-dimensional potential well created by a single-beam laser gradient trap, and discuss algorithms for compensating for any factors that might otherwise limit the quality of the optical trap.