Event Title

A Novel Peptide Inhibitor of the Polymerization of Deoxygenated Sickle Cell Hemoglobin

Graduation Year

2015

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

18-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

18-4-2015 10:00 AM

Description

Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder that causes red blood cells to form sickle shapes. These sickle-shaped red blood cells cannot pass through small blood vessels, which in turn causes tissue damage and cell death. The disease is caused by the exchange of a hydrophilic amino acid for a hydrophobic residue. This exchange enables deoxygenated hemoglobin molecules to interact with each other. This interaction causes the formation of long polymeric chains of hemoglobin that cause the red blood cell to be distorted into the sickle shape. Our group focuses on discovering peptides that can inhibit the polymerization of sickle cell hemoglobin. We previously identified a peptide, ZSF-39, that shows promise in preventing polymerization. My research involves testing the effectiveness of ZSF-39 in delaying the polymerization time of sickle cell hemoglobin at varying concentrations. This was done with UV-Vis assays. The results show that ZSF-39 can delay polymerization and that the length of the delay increases as concentration increases.

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Apr 18th, 9:00 AM Apr 18th, 10:00 AM

A Novel Peptide Inhibitor of the Polymerization of Deoxygenated Sickle Cell Hemoglobin

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder that causes red blood cells to form sickle shapes. These sickle-shaped red blood cells cannot pass through small blood vessels, which in turn causes tissue damage and cell death. The disease is caused by the exchange of a hydrophilic amino acid for a hydrophobic residue. This exchange enables deoxygenated hemoglobin molecules to interact with each other. This interaction causes the formation of long polymeric chains of hemoglobin that cause the red blood cell to be distorted into the sickle shape. Our group focuses on discovering peptides that can inhibit the polymerization of sickle cell hemoglobin. We previously identified a peptide, ZSF-39, that shows promise in preventing polymerization. My research involves testing the effectiveness of ZSF-39 in delaying the polymerization time of sickle cell hemoglobin at varying concentrations. This was done with UV-Vis assays. The results show that ZSF-39 can delay polymerization and that the length of the delay increases as concentration increases.