Graduation Year

2015

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

18-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

18-4-2015 3:00 PM

Description

The association between excessive alcohol use and adverse consequences among college students has been extensively researched over the past several decades. More specifically, heavy drinking in the college population has been linked to severe violence, accidental injuries, sexual assault, poor classroom performance, and psychological impairment (Pedrelli et al., 2010). To successfully limit these adverse consequences, it is important to understand the main risk factors that lead to excessive alcohol use. Anxiety sensitivity (AS) and stress have been separately identified as risk factors for problematic drinking (Stewart et al., 1999; Zvolensky et al., 2004). Additionally, a theory of motivational use of alcohol has suggested that the primary factor that influences drinking behaviors is one’s motivation (Cox & Klinger, 1988). The current study aims to investigate these three correlates. In particular, this study investigates whether AS and stress affect an individual’s urge and motive to drink. A multivariate analysis will be used to examine two main effects and one interaction effect. If the hypothesis is supported, students with high AS levels and high stress levels will report greater urges and higher coping motives to drink, which are indicative of heavier and more frequent problematic drinking (Cooper, 1994).

Included in

Psychology Commons

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Apr 18th, 2:00 PM Apr 18th, 3:00 PM

Anxiety Sensitivity, Stress, and Problematic Drinking Behaviors among College Students

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

The association between excessive alcohol use and adverse consequences among college students has been extensively researched over the past several decades. More specifically, heavy drinking in the college population has been linked to severe violence, accidental injuries, sexual assault, poor classroom performance, and psychological impairment (Pedrelli et al., 2010). To successfully limit these adverse consequences, it is important to understand the main risk factors that lead to excessive alcohol use. Anxiety sensitivity (AS) and stress have been separately identified as risk factors for problematic drinking (Stewart et al., 1999; Zvolensky et al., 2004). Additionally, a theory of motivational use of alcohol has suggested that the primary factor that influences drinking behaviors is one’s motivation (Cox & Klinger, 1988). The current study aims to investigate these three correlates. In particular, this study investigates whether AS and stress affect an individual’s urge and motive to drink. A multivariate analysis will be used to examine two main effects and one interaction effect. If the hypothesis is supported, students with high AS levels and high stress levels will report greater urges and higher coping motives to drink, which are indicative of heavier and more frequent problematic drinking (Cooper, 1994).