Abstract

Attachment styles and caregiving styles have provided a useful framework for conceptualizing romantic relationships. The present study seeks to examine whether perceptions of high parental conflict will predict less secure attachment and caregiving styles in the romantic relationships of young adults. It is hypothesized that higher perceptions of parental conflict, as measured by the Family Structure Survey and the Conflict Tactics Scale, will correlate positively with more insecure ratings on a dimensional attachment measure, and will correlate positively with maladaptive extremes of caregiving styles, measured using the Caregiving Questionnaire. Low correlations between dimensional attachment and parental conflict were found. Results are discussed in the context of a social-learning hypothesis for attachment and caregiving styles in the romantic relationships of young adults, with the parents' marriage being the primary model of romantic relationships.

Disciplines

Psychology

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Psychology Commons

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