Type of Submission

Event

Graduation Year

2011

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

9-4-2011 9:00 AM

End Date

9-4-2011 10:00 AM

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

Pulsed-radiofrequency neuromodulation (PRF) is a pain management technique that involves placing a needle electrode near nerves and generating electrical current pulses in order to modulate the transduction of somatosensory information through those nerves. This technique evolved from a similar radiofrequency (RF) procedure in which constant current is distributed to a nerve or neural structure. RF interrupts nerve conduction and prevents somatosensory information from reaching the brain. In the case of continuous radiofrequency, however, the destructive lesion can cause further complications and unwanted side effects. According to research, PRF, unlike RF, is non-destructive yet still induces analgesia and consequently represents a more advantageous technique. Only a handful of previous studies have attempted to determine the neural effects of PRF. The current study seeks to develop an animal model of PRF using the spared nerve injury model and, through molecular analysis of neurological tissues harvested from rats, examines mechanisms by which PRF causes analgesia.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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Apr 9th, 9:00 AM Apr 9th, 10:00 AM

Pulsed Radiofrequency Neuromodulation of Peripheral Nerve Injury

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Pulsed-radiofrequency neuromodulation (PRF) is a pain management technique that involves placing a needle electrode near nerves and generating electrical current pulses in order to modulate the transduction of somatosensory information through those nerves. This technique evolved from a similar radiofrequency (RF) procedure in which constant current is distributed to a nerve or neural structure. RF interrupts nerve conduction and prevents somatosensory information from reaching the brain. In the case of continuous radiofrequency, however, the destructive lesion can cause further complications and unwanted side effects. According to research, PRF, unlike RF, is non-destructive yet still induces analgesia and consequently represents a more advantageous technique. Only a handful of previous studies have attempted to determine the neural effects of PRF. The current study seeks to develop an animal model of PRF using the spared nerve injury model and, through molecular analysis of neurological tissues harvested from rats, examines mechanisms by which PRF causes analgesia.

 

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