Graduation Year

2011

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

9-4-2011 9:00 AM

End Date

9-4-2011 10:00 AM

Description

The goal of the project is to develop the Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) as a tool to study the biological effects of oxidative damage on rat pheochromocytoma cells (PCI2 cells). SECM is a useful tool for the analysis of biological samples because the ultramicroelectrode tip of the probe can detect the presence of electrochemically active compounds such as neurotransmitters, particularly dopamine and norepinephrine, while simultaneously characterizing the topography of the cell. The topography of the cell was determined by maintaining a constant distance between the tip of the electrode and the surface of the cell. In the collector mode, the potential of the SECM microelectrode can be set to detect dopamine release after stimulation. A spike in current indicated the release of neurotransmitters from the cell. Successful stimulation was observed on both undifferentiated and differentiated PC12 cells.

Included in

Chemistry Commons

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Apr 9th, 9:00 AM Apr 9th, 10:00 AM

Monitoring the Electrochemical Activity of Biological Samples Using Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

The goal of the project is to develop the Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) as a tool to study the biological effects of oxidative damage on rat pheochromocytoma cells (PCI2 cells). SECM is a useful tool for the analysis of biological samples because the ultramicroelectrode tip of the probe can detect the presence of electrochemically active compounds such as neurotransmitters, particularly dopamine and norepinephrine, while simultaneously characterizing the topography of the cell. The topography of the cell was determined by maintaining a constant distance between the tip of the electrode and the surface of the cell. In the collector mode, the potential of the SECM microelectrode can be set to detect dopamine release after stimulation. A spike in current indicated the release of neurotransmitters from the cell. Successful stimulation was observed on both undifferentiated and differentiated PC12 cells.