Title of Presentation

Making Multi-Age Work

Type of Submission

Event

Graduation Year

2012

Location

Lower Level, Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

14-4-2012 9:00 AM

End Date

14-4-2012 10:00 AM

Abstract

While student teaching in a combined first and second grade class, I was faced with the challenge of meeting the diverse needs of my students. In this study I address the challenges of teaching in a multi-age classroom. My goals were to develop an inclusive classroom community while exploring effective methods of organizing students for instruction, small group work, and independent practice. I employed a qualitative methodology, collecting data in the form of field notes, journal entries, student dialogues, student work, and lesson plans. I share stories of my successes and missteps and conclude that establishing an optimal multi-age classroom community works best when social and academic student relationships across grade lines are encouraged and the benefits of multi-age grouping are discussed with students. Additionally, I found that student learning was most successful when students were placed in changing and flexible groups and worked with others of various achievement levels.

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Apr 14th, 9:00 AM Apr 14th, 10:00 AM

Making Multi-Age Work

Lower Level, Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

While student teaching in a combined first and second grade class, I was faced with the challenge of meeting the diverse needs of my students. In this study I address the challenges of teaching in a multi-age classroom. My goals were to develop an inclusive classroom community while exploring effective methods of organizing students for instruction, small group work, and independent practice. I employed a qualitative methodology, collecting data in the form of field notes, journal entries, student dialogues, student work, and lesson plans. I share stories of my successes and missteps and conclude that establishing an optimal multi-age classroom community works best when social and academic student relationships across grade lines are encouraged and the benefits of multi-age grouping are discussed with students. Additionally, I found that student learning was most successful when students were placed in changing and flexible groups and worked with others of various achievement levels.

 

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