Forced Migration and Accumulation by Dispossession: A Suggested Model for Understanding Mexican Immigration

Alejandro Monzon, Illinois Wesleyan University
Meghan Burke, Faculty Advisor, Illinois Wesleyan University

Description

This study on Mexican immigration is two-fold. On the one hand, I will delineate how the logic of capital accumulation, particularly accumulation by dispossession, forces Mexicans to migrate to the United States. As a nuanced contribution to World Systems analysis of migration, I will highlight three Marxian concepts that dialectically constitute forced migration: ‘expanded reproduction’, the ‘global reserve army’ and ‘accumulation by dispossession.’ In today’s neoliberal era, ‘accumulation by dispossession’ proves to be a decisive aspect of capital accumulation. On the other hand, I will highlight specific aspects of the experiences of Mexican immigrants living in the Bloomington-Normal area in order to expose first hand the injustices of forced migration. In my conclusion, I will emphasize not only that migration is a human right, but also that there should be a right not to migrate: that is, development on people’s own terms is the necessary prescription to cease forced migration. Accordingly, I will bring attention to what migrants themselves affirm regarding what is to be done.

 
Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 11:00 AM

Forced Migration and Accumulation by Dispossession: A Suggested Model for Understanding Mexican Immigration

Room E104, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

This study on Mexican immigration is two-fold. On the one hand, I will delineate how the logic of capital accumulation, particularly accumulation by dispossession, forces Mexicans to migrate to the United States. As a nuanced contribution to World Systems analysis of migration, I will highlight three Marxian concepts that dialectically constitute forced migration: ‘expanded reproduction’, the ‘global reserve army’ and ‘accumulation by dispossession.’ In today’s neoliberal era, ‘accumulation by dispossession’ proves to be a decisive aspect of capital accumulation. On the other hand, I will highlight specific aspects of the experiences of Mexican immigrants living in the Bloomington-Normal area in order to expose first hand the injustices of forced migration. In my conclusion, I will emphasize not only that migration is a human right, but also that there should be a right not to migrate: that is, development on people’s own terms is the necessary prescription to cease forced migration. Accordingly, I will bring attention to what migrants themselves affirm regarding what is to be done.