Event Title

Harry Potter and the Literacy Classroom: The Importance and Influence of Student Choice

Graduation Year

2013

Location

Lower Level, Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

Description

In many classrooms, students learn to read through assigned classroom texts that are often disconnected from student interest. In these classrooms, students love for reading is not a priority. Incorporating student choice into the classroom allows educators to foster positive relationships between their students and reading, while exploring literacy concepts on an individual level. This paper investigates student choice in a literacy classroom, explores what influences students’ choices, and identifies potential conflicts between student chosen texts and expected classroom assignments. This study was completed using a qualitative self-study approach and included data collection methods, such as field notes, informal classroom discussions, and student work. The findings indicate that the students enjoyed the ability to chose what they were reading, that peers and book availability played a large part in the selection process, and that a classroom could utilize a variety of student choice options to cover the required material.

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Apr 20th, 9:00 AM Apr 20th, 10:00 AM

Harry Potter and the Literacy Classroom: The Importance and Influence of Student Choice

Lower Level, Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

In many classrooms, students learn to read through assigned classroom texts that are often disconnected from student interest. In these classrooms, students love for reading is not a priority. Incorporating student choice into the classroom allows educators to foster positive relationships between their students and reading, while exploring literacy concepts on an individual level. This paper investigates student choice in a literacy classroom, explores what influences students’ choices, and identifies potential conflicts between student chosen texts and expected classroom assignments. This study was completed using a qualitative self-study approach and included data collection methods, such as field notes, informal classroom discussions, and student work. The findings indicate that the students enjoyed the ability to chose what they were reading, that peers and book availability played a large part in the selection process, and that a classroom could utilize a variety of student choice options to cover the required material.