Event Title

Teacher Immediacy

Graduation Year

2013

Location

Lower Level, Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

Description

Actively engaging students within the classroom is one of the most challenging aspects of the classroom environment. Behaviors that depict an instructor as relatable and understandable can have positive effects upon student engagement in class. An instructor acting with these types of behaviors is said to have teacher immediacy. The desired outcomes connected to teacher immediacy are effective increases in a student’s learning and motivation. The research lacks a conclusive evidence of a direct link between immediacy and student progression, however, an instructor’s awareness of proper immediate behaviors has shown to have a positive effect on a student’s perception of their relationships with teachers. Through a comprehensive study of teacher action research, case studies, and survey research over the past decade, this paper delves into the correlation between immediate behavior and student progress.

Included in

Education Commons

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Apr 20th, 9:00 AM Apr 20th, 10:00 AM

Teacher Immediacy

Lower Level, Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Actively engaging students within the classroom is one of the most challenging aspects of the classroom environment. Behaviors that depict an instructor as relatable and understandable can have positive effects upon student engagement in class. An instructor acting with these types of behaviors is said to have teacher immediacy. The desired outcomes connected to teacher immediacy are effective increases in a student’s learning and motivation. The research lacks a conclusive evidence of a direct link between immediacy and student progression, however, an instructor’s awareness of proper immediate behaviors has shown to have a positive effect on a student’s perception of their relationships with teachers. Through a comprehensive study of teacher action research, case studies, and survey research over the past decade, this paper delves into the correlation between immediate behavior and student progress.