Event Title

Perceptions of Gender in a Fourth Grade Classroom

Graduation Year

2013

Location

Lower Level, Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

Description

Embedded concepts of gender influence student language and may prevent students from thinking outside of personal biases. Teachers have the opportunity to open up spaces for students to explore perceptions of gender through literature. Through small group discussion framed by children’s literature, I attempted to encourage students to examine their own understandings of gender and create an atmosphere of respect and acceptance. This self-study included data collection through field notes, formal and informal discussion, and audio recordings of small-group discussion. The findings of this study indicate differences between students’ ideas of gender in peer-to-peer conversation and in formal, teacher-led discussion. Students demonstrated an awareness of gender roles within children’s literature but not the implications of gender in the classroom. This study suggest that small-group discussion with students provides opportunities for teachers to incorporate meaningful discussion about gender issues and additional gender research is warranted focused on peer-to-peer interactions.

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Apr 20th, 9:00 AM Apr 20th, 10:00 AM

Perceptions of Gender in a Fourth Grade Classroom

Lower Level, Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Embedded concepts of gender influence student language and may prevent students from thinking outside of personal biases. Teachers have the opportunity to open up spaces for students to explore perceptions of gender through literature. Through small group discussion framed by children’s literature, I attempted to encourage students to examine their own understandings of gender and create an atmosphere of respect and acceptance. This self-study included data collection through field notes, formal and informal discussion, and audio recordings of small-group discussion. The findings of this study indicate differences between students’ ideas of gender in peer-to-peer conversation and in formal, teacher-led discussion. Students demonstrated an awareness of gender roles within children’s literature but not the implications of gender in the classroom. This study suggest that small-group discussion with students provides opportunities for teachers to incorporate meaningful discussion about gender issues and additional gender research is warranted focused on peer-to-peer interactions.