Event Title

Why They Rise up, or Not A Study of Linguistic Minorities and Ethnic-National Mobilization

Graduation Year

2013

Location

Room E101, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 11:00 AM

Description

Most theories of nationalism focus on majority nationalism and do not provide an adequate explanation of the inaction of most ethnic minorities. The first part of this paper adopts the political process model from social movement theory to study the factors that prompt linguistic minorities to mobilization on ethno-national grounds. Using a large-N statistical model with data drawn from the Minority at Risk database, the results indicate that the higher capacity, the more opportunity for action, and the better the issue is framed, the more likely linguistic minorities would mobilize. Applying these findings, a most similar system design is used in the second part of the paper to compare the Uzbek minorities in Central Asia and the Uyghur minorities in China. The study shows that population density and distribution, the existence of a titular state, and the formation of cultural identity are the key factors that had influenced their decisions of mobilizing or not.

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 11:00 AM

Why They Rise up, or Not A Study of Linguistic Minorities and Ethnic-National Mobilization

Room E101, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Most theories of nationalism focus on majority nationalism and do not provide an adequate explanation of the inaction of most ethnic minorities. The first part of this paper adopts the political process model from social movement theory to study the factors that prompt linguistic minorities to mobilization on ethno-national grounds. Using a large-N statistical model with data drawn from the Minority at Risk database, the results indicate that the higher capacity, the more opportunity for action, and the better the issue is framed, the more likely linguistic minorities would mobilize. Applying these findings, a most similar system design is used in the second part of the paper to compare the Uzbek minorities in Central Asia and the Uyghur minorities in China. The study shows that population density and distribution, the existence of a titular state, and the formation of cultural identity are the key factors that had influenced their decisions of mobilizing or not.