Event Title

Starting the Switch: Illinois Wesleyan’s Movement Towards Cleaner Transportation

Graduation Year

2013

Location

Room E104, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 11:00 AM

Description

Illinois Wesleyan University had a carbon footprint of 129 metric tons in the 2011 to 2012 school year for its thirty-three-vehicle fleet. This study addresses the feasibility of Illinois Wesleyan adopting new policies to reduce its fleet carbon emissions and whether or not Illinois Wesleyan can transition to alternative fuel vehicles. A general overview of transportation benefits, costs, and policies in the United States is explained and is presented along with what other schools similar to Illinois Wesleyan’s scale have done. The research design and methodologies include archival research of gasoline usage, a survey of fleet users, and interviews with department heads and individual users. The most significant research findings were determined through interviews, which showed support from all departments and individuals for transitioning to alternative fuel vehicles and determined several possible policies that are Illinois Wesleyan specific. Policy implications range from implementing an anti-idling policy to generating biodiesel fuel from campus wastes.

However, the feasibility of Illinois Wesleyan transitioning its fleet to alternative fuel vehicles is not possible due to the current university budget constraints.

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 11:00 AM

Starting the Switch: Illinois Wesleyan’s Movement Towards Cleaner Transportation

Room E104, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Illinois Wesleyan University had a carbon footprint of 129 metric tons in the 2011 to 2012 school year for its thirty-three-vehicle fleet. This study addresses the feasibility of Illinois Wesleyan adopting new policies to reduce its fleet carbon emissions and whether or not Illinois Wesleyan can transition to alternative fuel vehicles. A general overview of transportation benefits, costs, and policies in the United States is explained and is presented along with what other schools similar to Illinois Wesleyan’s scale have done. The research design and methodologies include archival research of gasoline usage, a survey of fleet users, and interviews with department heads and individual users. The most significant research findings were determined through interviews, which showed support from all departments and individuals for transitioning to alternative fuel vehicles and determined several possible policies that are Illinois Wesleyan specific. Policy implications range from implementing an anti-idling policy to generating biodiesel fuel from campus wastes.

However, the feasibility of Illinois Wesleyan transitioning its fleet to alternative fuel vehicles is not possible due to the current university budget constraints.