Event Title

Interpreting Sacred Text: Is Joe Wright’s Film Adaptation of Anna Karenina Compelling or Criminal?

Graduation Year

2015

Location

Room E105, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 11:00 AM

Description

When canonical literary works are adapted to the screen, there is often skepticism about whether or not the film version maintains the integrity of the original text. Skepticism is, however, the mildest of reactions amongst Russians’ recent outrage for Joe Wright’s 2012 Motion Picture adaptation of Anna Karenina. Often recognized as one of Tolstoy’s most beloved and compelling novels, Anna Karenina is also revered as a national treasure in its homeland. The film, with a screenplay adapted, directed and performed by British artists, incited fury not only for its liberating stylistic choices, but also simply for failing to appreciate Russia’s national spirit. Does this indicate that Putin’s Russia is returning to the same nationalist mentality of the Soviet era? Should other nations then be barred from showcasing and exploring another country’s art across different mediums? Are film interpretations even capable of maintaining the integrity of literary classics?

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 11:00 AM

Interpreting Sacred Text: Is Joe Wright’s Film Adaptation of Anna Karenina Compelling or Criminal?

Room E105, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

When canonical literary works are adapted to the screen, there is often skepticism about whether or not the film version maintains the integrity of the original text. Skepticism is, however, the mildest of reactions amongst Russians’ recent outrage for Joe Wright’s 2012 Motion Picture adaptation of Anna Karenina. Often recognized as one of Tolstoy’s most beloved and compelling novels, Anna Karenina is also revered as a national treasure in its homeland. The film, with a screenplay adapted, directed and performed by British artists, incited fury not only for its liberating stylistic choices, but also simply for failing to appreciate Russia’s national spirit. Does this indicate that Putin’s Russia is returning to the same nationalist mentality of the Soviet era? Should other nations then be barred from showcasing and exploring another country’s art across different mediums? Are film interpretations even capable of maintaining the integrity of literary classics?