Type of Submission

Event

Graduation Year

2013

Location

Atrium, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

This study examined environmental identity and connection to animals in college students. Previous research has suggested that exposure to animals and nature can increase caring for both animals and nature itself. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four video conditions and analyzed for differences in mood, environmental identity, and connectedness to animals after the viewing of these videos. No significant differences were found between experimental groups for environmental identity or connectedness to animals, but it was found that those who viewed an animal reported greater improvement in mood, and that this effect differed based on whether the animal was inside or outside. Results did indicate that those who owned pets during childhood reported higher levels of environmental identity than those who did not own pets. The findings of this study suggest the need for more research to determine how connection with nature and animals can best be nurtured.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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Apr 20th, 9:00 AM Apr 20th, 10:00 AM

The Effect of Pets and Nature on Environmental Identity and Connection to Animals

Atrium, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

This study examined environmental identity and connection to animals in college students. Previous research has suggested that exposure to animals and nature can increase caring for both animals and nature itself. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four video conditions and analyzed for differences in mood, environmental identity, and connectedness to animals after the viewing of these videos. No significant differences were found between experimental groups for environmental identity or connectedness to animals, but it was found that those who viewed an animal reported greater improvement in mood, and that this effect differed based on whether the animal was inside or outside. Results did indicate that those who owned pets during childhood reported higher levels of environmental identity than those who did not own pets. The findings of this study suggest the need for more research to determine how connection with nature and animals can best be nurtured.

 

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