Event Title

Home, Transformed: A Visual Ethnography of a Puerto Rican Professor in the Midwest

Graduation Year

2013

Location

Atrium, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

Description

Through the use of collaborative ethnography and photography, this poster provides insight into the struggles of identity and exclusion faced by Puerto Ricans living in the continental United States. Utilizing collaborative methods and visual media, this research presents the story of a local Puerto Rican sociology professor. This poster visually examines how this woman’s experience as a migrant has been characterized by a deep-seated ambivalence regarding her status as a United States citizen. Additionally, it illustrates how three experiences (teaching sociology as a woman of color in a predominantly white university, forming communities with other local Latinos/as, and becoming a mother to a bicultural son) have shaped and continue to shape her notion of “home.”

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Apr 20th, 9:00 AM Apr 20th, 10:00 AM

Home, Transformed: A Visual Ethnography of a Puerto Rican Professor in the Midwest

Atrium, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Through the use of collaborative ethnography and photography, this poster provides insight into the struggles of identity and exclusion faced by Puerto Ricans living in the continental United States. Utilizing collaborative methods and visual media, this research presents the story of a local Puerto Rican sociology professor. This poster visually examines how this woman’s experience as a migrant has been characterized by a deep-seated ambivalence regarding her status as a United States citizen. Additionally, it illustrates how three experiences (teaching sociology as a woman of color in a predominantly white university, forming communities with other local Latinos/as, and becoming a mother to a bicultural son) have shaped and continue to shape her notion of “home.”