Event Title

The Significance of the Windmills in Don Quixote Of La Mancha El Significado De Los Molinos De Viento En Don Quijote De La Mancha

Graduation Year

2013

Location

Atrium, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

20-4-2013 2:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2013 3:00 PM

Description

Even if they have not read Miguel de Cervantes’s The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha, most people are familiar with Quixote’s adventure with the windmills. The impact of the episode is undeniable—from the allusive idiom tilting at windmills to Picasso’s famous painting of Don Quixote and his squire, Sancho, with windmills in the background. This project examines why the windmills episode continues to have an impact. Findings suggest that the windmills episode is Don Quixote’s best-known adventure because it transcends time and social class. For example, windmills are still present today, and Don Quixote’s fight with the windmills represents the ever-present struggle between man and machine. Additionally, windmills are typically not owned by individual people, but form part of the environment as icons that appeal to people across centuries and social classes.

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Apr 20th, 2:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

The Significance of the Windmills in Don Quixote Of La Mancha El Significado De Los Molinos De Viento En Don Quijote De La Mancha

Atrium, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Even if they have not read Miguel de Cervantes’s The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha, most people are familiar with Quixote’s adventure with the windmills. The impact of the episode is undeniable—from the allusive idiom tilting at windmills to Picasso’s famous painting of Don Quixote and his squire, Sancho, with windmills in the background. This project examines why the windmills episode continues to have an impact. Findings suggest that the windmills episode is Don Quixote’s best-known adventure because it transcends time and social class. For example, windmills are still present today, and Don Quixote’s fight with the windmills represents the ever-present struggle between man and machine. Additionally, windmills are typically not owned by individual people, but form part of the environment as icons that appeal to people across centuries and social classes.