Event Title

Reading Without Understanding: Literacy in the Secondary History Classroom

Graduation Year

2014

Location

Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

11-4-2014 4:00 PM

End Date

11-4-2014 5:00 PM

Description

In high schools today, students are struggling with literacy despite its increased importance. Although performance on various standardized tests indicates the prevalence of this issue, many teachers are uncertain about how to address it. Teachers who incorporate various literacy strategies, both general and disciplinary, assist students in developing these crucial literacy skills. In this qualitative self study of student teaching, I explored the use of different literacy techniques in a high school history classroom. I incorporated active reading strategies, graphic organizers, political cartoons, and disciplinary literacy. Based upon my observations and student work samples, my preliminary findings indicate that different methods appeal to different students. As a result, including various strategies in the history classroom may be important to helping improve literacy levels in a diverse classroom of learners.

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Apr 11th, 4:00 PM Apr 11th, 5:00 PM

Reading Without Understanding: Literacy in the Secondary History Classroom

Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

In high schools today, students are struggling with literacy despite its increased importance. Although performance on various standardized tests indicates the prevalence of this issue, many teachers are uncertain about how to address it. Teachers who incorporate various literacy strategies, both general and disciplinary, assist students in developing these crucial literacy skills. In this qualitative self study of student teaching, I explored the use of different literacy techniques in a high school history classroom. I incorporated active reading strategies, graphic organizers, political cartoons, and disciplinary literacy. Based upon my observations and student work samples, my preliminary findings indicate that different methods appeal to different students. As a result, including various strategies in the history classroom may be important to helping improve literacy levels in a diverse classroom of learners.