Graduation Year

2014

Location

Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

11-4-2014 4:00 PM

End Date

11-4-2014 5:00 PM

Description

Using technology as a tool to differentiate instruction in a classroom meets the needs of many students by increasing interest and motivation and connecting the students to the material (Morgan, 2014). The purpose of my self-study is to determine the benefits of using technology as a tool in differentiating mathematics instruction. I implemented MobyMax, an online intervention program with progress monitoring, into a 4th grade classroom every day for three weeks. MobyMax provides differentiated curriculum based on a test each student takes at the beginning and a series of ability level dependent assessments students take throughout the year. The students worked on the program for a minimum of 20 minutes of mathematics instruction everyday during school, and if possible, at home. I wrote field notes about six specific students, noted the numbers of correct problems that all students completed in a week, and collected other quantitative data recorded by MobyMax. I quantitatively analyzed these data sets to show that students met the Common Core Math State Standards that they had not previously mastered.

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Apr 11th, 4:00 PM Apr 11th, 5:00 PM

Using Mobymax to Differentiate Elementary Mathematics Instruction

Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Using technology as a tool to differentiate instruction in a classroom meets the needs of many students by increasing interest and motivation and connecting the students to the material (Morgan, 2014). The purpose of my self-study is to determine the benefits of using technology as a tool in differentiating mathematics instruction. I implemented MobyMax, an online intervention program with progress monitoring, into a 4th grade classroom every day for three weeks. MobyMax provides differentiated curriculum based on a test each student takes at the beginning and a series of ability level dependent assessments students take throughout the year. The students worked on the program for a minimum of 20 minutes of mathematics instruction everyday during school, and if possible, at home. I wrote field notes about six specific students, noted the numbers of correct problems that all students completed in a week, and collected other quantitative data recorded by MobyMax. I quantitatively analyzed these data sets to show that students met the Common Core Math State Standards that they had not previously mastered.