Graduation Year

2014

Location

Room E104, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 11:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Stated choice experiments have been shown to be a reliable valuation method for non-marketed goods and services. These experiments are usually conducted in a hypothetical survey form. Previous research has indicated that certain behavioral patterns in elicited respondents are inherent in the survey form and length. This study attempts to investigate if there is evidence of the behavioral patterns of preference learning and fatigue by analyzing data from two spate stated choice studies: 1) extensions to Constitution Trail in Bloomington/Normal, IL, 2) Riparian Forest Restoration in the Middle Rio Grande, NM. In comparing the estimated willingness to pays for each of the studies, there is evidence of a preference learning effect in both studies. Empirical evidence is not found to conclude that there is a fatigue effect. These lend evidence that researchers need to recognize that there is learning by participants in stated choice studies. As such the first few questions in a choice experimental survey may not provide stable preferences and should not be included in the value estimates.

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Economics Commons

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 12:00 PM

Respondent Learning and Fatigue in Stated Choice Experiments

Room E104, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Stated choice experiments have been shown to be a reliable valuation method for non-marketed goods and services. These experiments are usually conducted in a hypothetical survey form. Previous research has indicated that certain behavioral patterns in elicited respondents are inherent in the survey form and length. This study attempts to investigate if there is evidence of the behavioral patterns of preference learning and fatigue by analyzing data from two spate stated choice studies: 1) extensions to Constitution Trail in Bloomington/Normal, IL, 2) Riparian Forest Restoration in the Middle Rio Grande, NM. In comparing the estimated willingness to pays for each of the studies, there is evidence of a preference learning effect in both studies. Empirical evidence is not found to conclude that there is a fatigue effect. These lend evidence that researchers need to recognize that there is learning by participants in stated choice studies. As such the first few questions in a choice experimental survey may not provide stable preferences and should not be included in the value estimates.