Event Title

Is All Spanglish the Same Spanglish?: An Analysis of Code Switching Among Bilingual Speakers of Colombian, Cuban, and Mexican Origin

Graduation Year

2014

Location

Room E105, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 11:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Code switching is a phenomena used to describe those instances in which Spanish speakers in the United States interchange between English and Spanish during oral production. This phenomenon is thought to result from the influence of an English dominant society on the Spanish language. Linguistics research has indicated that the use of Spanish and English during conversations is governed by the grammar rules of both languages as a result of linguistic fusion. This study aims to evaluate Colombian, Cuban, and Mexican bilingual speakers for the presence of code switching during oral production through the use of ethnographic interviews. From these interviews an assessment of the similarities and variations present in the code switching used by the participants will be made leading to conclusions that may provide insight regarding the influence that the English language has on code-switching patterns.

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 12:00 PM

Is All Spanglish the Same Spanglish?: An Analysis of Code Switching Among Bilingual Speakers of Colombian, Cuban, and Mexican Origin

Room E105, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Code switching is a phenomena used to describe those instances in which Spanish speakers in the United States interchange between English and Spanish during oral production. This phenomenon is thought to result from the influence of an English dominant society on the Spanish language. Linguistics research has indicated that the use of Spanish and English during conversations is governed by the grammar rules of both languages as a result of linguistic fusion. This study aims to evaluate Colombian, Cuban, and Mexican bilingual speakers for the presence of code switching during oral production through the use of ethnographic interviews. From these interviews an assessment of the similarities and variations present in the code switching used by the participants will be made leading to conclusions that may provide insight regarding the influence that the English language has on code-switching patterns.