Event Title

Evidence-based Practice in Action: Assuring Caregiver Satisfaction in Pediatric Assessment Protocol Changes

Graduation Year

2014

Location

Room E101, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 11:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Background: Charting head-to-toe assessments requires valuable nursing time that could be spent providing direct patient care. Reducing the amount of charting through the reduction in frequency of head-to-toe assessments allows more time for direct care. Additional time for hands on patient care can increase nurse satisfaction.

Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to examine care provider satisfaction pre- and post-protocol change.

Methods: Student designed surveys were developed for this study and sent to care providers on the pediatric unit 2 weeks prior to the protocol change and again 6 weeks following implementation.

Results: Nurses reported that the amount of time spent charting took away from hands on patient care prior to the change. In an analysis of post-test results, nurses reported that the protocol change allowed them to spend more time with patients delivering direct, hands-on care. Physician results were insufficient to analyze.

Discussion: Overall, the protocol change yielded positive results for nurses; however, this research needs to be repeated in a hospital with a larger sample size. While data analysis of research indicates an increase satisfaction amongst nurses post-implementation, provider data was insufficient to analyze.

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 12:00 PM

Evidence-based Practice in Action: Assuring Caregiver Satisfaction in Pediatric Assessment Protocol Changes

Room E101, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Background: Charting head-to-toe assessments requires valuable nursing time that could be spent providing direct patient care. Reducing the amount of charting through the reduction in frequency of head-to-toe assessments allows more time for direct care. Additional time for hands on patient care can increase nurse satisfaction.

Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to examine care provider satisfaction pre- and post-protocol change.

Methods: Student designed surveys were developed for this study and sent to care providers on the pediatric unit 2 weeks prior to the protocol change and again 6 weeks following implementation.

Results: Nurses reported that the amount of time spent charting took away from hands on patient care prior to the change. In an analysis of post-test results, nurses reported that the protocol change allowed them to spend more time with patients delivering direct, hands-on care. Physician results were insufficient to analyze.

Discussion: Overall, the protocol change yielded positive results for nurses; however, this research needs to be repeated in a hospital with a larger sample size. While data analysis of research indicates an increase satisfaction amongst nurses post-implementation, provider data was insufficient to analyze.