Event Title

Impact of School Nurse Job Satisfaction and Health Education in the Classroom on Student Health Outcomes

Graduation Year

2014

Location

Room E101, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 11:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2014 12:00 PM

Description

School nurses have a large scope of practice (American Nurses Association [ANA] & National Association of School Nurses [NASN], 2011). However, school administrators often misunderstand, and therefore under appreciate, the school nurses’ role (Junious, et al., 2004). In addition, few schools meet the 1:750 nurse to student ratio recommended by the NASN and the ANA (2011); high nurse to student ratios negatively affect school nurses’ job satisfaction (Maughn & Adams, 2011). Several studies found that interventions by the school nurse positively impacted students (e.g., Bonauito, 2007; Denny, et al., 2012), while others have linked the presence of a school nurse with improved attendance (e.g., Pennington & Delaney, 2008; Telljohann, Dake, & Price, 2004). This study surveys nurses working at schools in Illinois, and adds to this body of research by examining the relationship between nurses' time spent on classroom health education and job satisfaction, as well as the impact of classroom education and their job satisfaction on student health outcomes.

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 12:00 PM

Impact of School Nurse Job Satisfaction and Health Education in the Classroom on Student Health Outcomes

Room E101, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

School nurses have a large scope of practice (American Nurses Association [ANA] & National Association of School Nurses [NASN], 2011). However, school administrators often misunderstand, and therefore under appreciate, the school nurses’ role (Junious, et al., 2004). In addition, few schools meet the 1:750 nurse to student ratio recommended by the NASN and the ANA (2011); high nurse to student ratios negatively affect school nurses’ job satisfaction (Maughn & Adams, 2011). Several studies found that interventions by the school nurse positively impacted students (e.g., Bonauito, 2007; Denny, et al., 2012), while others have linked the presence of a school nurse with improved attendance (e.g., Pennington & Delaney, 2008; Telljohann, Dake, & Price, 2004). This study surveys nurses working at schools in Illinois, and adds to this body of research by examining the relationship between nurses' time spent on classroom health education and job satisfaction, as well as the impact of classroom education and their job satisfaction on student health outcomes.