Event Title

Students Ask the Questions: Using Student-Generated Questions to Facilitate Classroom Discourse

Graduation Year

2014

Location

Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

11-4-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

11-4-2014 6:00 PM

Description

Student-generated questions help students understand teacher expectations, develop their thinking, and comprehend subject matter, and allow teachers to plan lessons that meet students’ needs and interests (Almeida, 2010). In an effort to generate student questions during my student teaching in a fourth grade classroom, I implemented a self-study in which I encouraged my students to generate their own questions in language arts. I taught them what a higher order question is (Bloom’s Taxonomy, 1965) and provided them opportunities to generate such questions at the end of multiple lessons. Students participated in a full-class discussion where they generated and discussed their questions with each other. Through field notes and student work samples, I found that my students were successful in generating higher order questions. Audio recordings and an end of semester student questionnaire showed that students were engaged and excited about participating when they were able to discuss their own questions.

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Apr 11th, 5:00 PM Apr 11th, 6:00 PM

Students Ask the Questions: Using Student-Generated Questions to Facilitate Classroom Discourse

Ames Library, Illinois Wesleyan University

Student-generated questions help students understand teacher expectations, develop their thinking, and comprehend subject matter, and allow teachers to plan lessons that meet students’ needs and interests (Almeida, 2010). In an effort to generate student questions during my student teaching in a fourth grade classroom, I implemented a self-study in which I encouraged my students to generate their own questions in language arts. I taught them what a higher order question is (Bloom’s Taxonomy, 1965) and provided them opportunities to generate such questions at the end of multiple lessons. Students participated in a full-class discussion where they generated and discussed their questions with each other. Through field notes and student work samples, I found that my students were successful in generating higher order questions. Audio recordings and an end of semester student questionnaire showed that students were engaged and excited about participating when they were able to discuss their own questions.