Graduation Year

2014

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2014 10:00 AM

Description

Recent studies have shown that lead shotgun slugs and muzzleloader bullets often fragment inside game animals. The majority of ammunition types used in firearms that are permitted by the State of Illinois for hunting white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) contain lead, which is toxic to both humans and animals that scavenge deer carcasses. Although many studies have examined the impact of lead bullet fragmentation in game animals from high powered rifles, few studies have documented the presence of lead fragments from shotgun slugs and muzzleloader bullets in ground venison meant for human consumption in Illinois. In this study, ground venison packets obtained from firearm-harvested and bow-killed deer during the 2013 and 2014 Illinois deer hunting seasons were x-rayed to determine the presence of lead fragments. X-ray images revealed possible lead fragments in 6/10 of ground venison packets from firearm-harvested deer. Further tests will be performed to determine lead levels in all venison packets.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 10:00 AM

The Prevalence of Lead Fragments from Shotgun Slugs/Muzzleoader Bullets in Ground Venision Meant for Human Consumption

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Recent studies have shown that lead shotgun slugs and muzzleloader bullets often fragment inside game animals. The majority of ammunition types used in firearms that are permitted by the State of Illinois for hunting white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) contain lead, which is toxic to both humans and animals that scavenge deer carcasses. Although many studies have examined the impact of lead bullet fragmentation in game animals from high powered rifles, few studies have documented the presence of lead fragments from shotgun slugs and muzzleloader bullets in ground venison meant for human consumption in Illinois. In this study, ground venison packets obtained from firearm-harvested and bow-killed deer during the 2013 and 2014 Illinois deer hunting seasons were x-rayed to determine the presence of lead fragments. X-ray images revealed possible lead fragments in 6/10 of ground venison packets from firearm-harvested deer. Further tests will be performed to determine lead levels in all venison packets.