Event Title

Overcoming Auditory Illusion Through Optical Reality

Graduation Year

2015

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2014 10:00 AM

Description

Most people seem to be well-acquainted with optical illusions. Whether through everyday experience or from printed collections, one is bound to happen across numerous optical illusions during their lifetime. However, illusions can affect our other senses as well. Auditory illusions, similar to optical illusions, arise from the complexities of the brain’s interpretation of sound. They are not wholly uncommon, appearing frequently in a variety of musical works and occasionally in everyday life, yet arguably occur far less regularly than optical illusions. Our ultimate goal is to develop methods of overcoming an auditory illusion, or to at least alter its significance, through a visual cue such as an animated video. As illusions are by their very definition a false reality, the ability to not only understand how these illusions are propagated, but what is needed to overcome them should be of much interest to those in the physical and psychological sciences. Furthermore, those in the performing arts may find the end results of this project to be of interest as many 21st century artists are attempting to blend sight and audio in novel fashions.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 10:00 AM

Overcoming Auditory Illusion Through Optical Reality

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Most people seem to be well-acquainted with optical illusions. Whether through everyday experience or from printed collections, one is bound to happen across numerous optical illusions during their lifetime. However, illusions can affect our other senses as well. Auditory illusions, similar to optical illusions, arise from the complexities of the brain’s interpretation of sound. They are not wholly uncommon, appearing frequently in a variety of musical works and occasionally in everyday life, yet arguably occur far less regularly than optical illusions. Our ultimate goal is to develop methods of overcoming an auditory illusion, or to at least alter its significance, through a visual cue such as an animated video. As illusions are by their very definition a false reality, the ability to not only understand how these illusions are propagated, but what is needed to overcome them should be of much interest to those in the physical and psychological sciences. Furthermore, those in the performing arts may find the end results of this project to be of interest as many 21st century artists are attempting to blend sight and audio in novel fashions.