Event Title

What's on Your Mind?: Facebook and the Development of Spanish Identity in the United States

Graduation Year

2014

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

4-2014 10:00 AM

Description

As the Spanish-speaking population in the U.S. continues to increase, researchers find more ways to observe and analyze the use and role of the first language in bilingual speakers. Various studies conclude that this population continues to use their first language in order to maintain their cultural identity while acculturating to their lives in the U.S. With the growing amount of social media outlets, bilingual Spanish-speakers in the U.S. are provided with more forms of expression and ways to create their cultural identity. This study attempts to analyze the creation of this identity through the language used on Facebook by five native speakers in the Northwest suburbs of Chicago. This study will show that these individuals possibly use their first language to show affiliation with other Spanish-speakers.

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 1st, 10:00 AM

What's on Your Mind?: Facebook and the Development of Spanish Identity in the United States

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

As the Spanish-speaking population in the U.S. continues to increase, researchers find more ways to observe and analyze the use and role of the first language in bilingual speakers. Various studies conclude that this population continues to use their first language in order to maintain their cultural identity while acculturating to their lives in the U.S. With the growing amount of social media outlets, bilingual Spanish-speakers in the U.S. are provided with more forms of expression and ways to create their cultural identity. This study attempts to analyze the creation of this identity through the language used on Facebook by five native speakers in the Northwest suburbs of Chicago. This study will show that these individuals possibly use their first language to show affiliation with other Spanish-speakers.