Event Title

The Role of the Medial Septal Area in Regulating Theta Rhythm in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

Graduation Year

2014

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

12-4-2014 3:00 PM

Description

The theta rhythm is an EEG brain wave pattern in the frequency range of 4-8 Hz that is thought to be involved in learning and memory. Previous research has indicated that the medial septal area (MSA) of the brain controls the theta rhythm in the hippocampus. The current study examines whether the MSA also regulates the theta rhythm in the anterior cingulate region of the prefrontal cortex. Four Long-Evans rats underwent surgical implantation of a recording electrode in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). A guide cannula was also inserted into the MSA to deliver various drugs to temporarily lesion the MSA. Substances delivered to the MSA included muscimol, which activates GABA receptors, scopolamine, which blocks acetylcholine receptors, and alcohol. Saline was also delivered as a control treatment. Theta rhythm in the ACC was recorded during administration of each treatment to determine if inactivation of the MSA decreased ACC theta power. Results will be discussed.

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Apr 12th, 2:00 PM Apr 12th, 3:00 PM

The Role of the Medial Septal Area in Regulating Theta Rhythm in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

The theta rhythm is an EEG brain wave pattern in the frequency range of 4-8 Hz that is thought to be involved in learning and memory. Previous research has indicated that the medial septal area (MSA) of the brain controls the theta rhythm in the hippocampus. The current study examines whether the MSA also regulates the theta rhythm in the anterior cingulate region of the prefrontal cortex. Four Long-Evans rats underwent surgical implantation of a recording electrode in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). A guide cannula was also inserted into the MSA to deliver various drugs to temporarily lesion the MSA. Substances delivered to the MSA included muscimol, which activates GABA receptors, scopolamine, which blocks acetylcholine receptors, and alcohol. Saline was also delivered as a control treatment. Theta rhythm in the ACC was recorded during administration of each treatment to determine if inactivation of the MSA decreased ACC theta power. Results will be discussed.