Event Title

The Development of a Supramolecular Receptor for Environmentally Friendly Oxidation Catalysts

Graduation Year

2014

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

12-4-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

12-4-2014 3:00 PM

Description

Polyoxometalates (POMs) are anionic, metal-oxygen clusters with large, spherical, cage-like structures. The Keggin structure is one of the best-known POM structures. POMs are environmentally benign oxidation catalysts that can activate green oxidizing reagents such as oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. POMs have been widely used for bleaching paper pulp, treating organic dye pollutants, and converting solar energy to chemical energy. After a chemical process complete, POMs can be extracted from the mixture and recycled for future use. Our research focuses on building macrocyclic receptors to be used for recognizing and recovering POMs. The receptor molecule currently under investigation has an earmuff shape and consists of two triazacyclononane (TACN) units that are bridged together using a hydrocarbon chain. The TACN units will be protonated at low pH and their resulting positive charge will attract the POMs. The length and structure of the bridge can be modified to accommodate POMs of different sizes and charges.

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Apr 12th, 2:00 PM Apr 12th, 3:00 PM

The Development of a Supramolecular Receptor for Environmentally Friendly Oxidation Catalysts

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Polyoxometalates (POMs) are anionic, metal-oxygen clusters with large, spherical, cage-like structures. The Keggin structure is one of the best-known POM structures. POMs are environmentally benign oxidation catalysts that can activate green oxidizing reagents such as oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. POMs have been widely used for bleaching paper pulp, treating organic dye pollutants, and converting solar energy to chemical energy. After a chemical process complete, POMs can be extracted from the mixture and recycled for future use. Our research focuses on building macrocyclic receptors to be used for recognizing and recovering POMs. The receptor molecule currently under investigation has an earmuff shape and consists of two triazacyclononane (TACN) units that are bridged together using a hydrocarbon chain. The TACN units will be protonated at low pH and their resulting positive charge will attract the POMs. The length and structure of the bridge can be modified to accommodate POMs of different sizes and charges.