Event Title

Incentivizing Cadaver Organ Donors

Graduation Year

2015

Location

Room C102, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

18-4-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

18-4-2015 11:00 AM

Description

This article analyzes the use of monetary incentives to increase the supply of cadaver organs in Bloomington, Illinois. The focus is whether a waiver of a driver’s license fee can increase the supply of cadaver donors. In addition, the dynamics of organ donation are addressed and bivariate regressions are utilized to test if being a college student, religion, age, gender, and overall knowledge of donation has any impact on being an organ donor and willingness to accept the monetary incentive. Finally, the concern that a monetary and altruistic market can coexist is addressed in the paper. Utilizing sample z-tests, we discover that a small incentive has a significant impact increasing the number of cadaver organ donors for the studied population and the introduction of the market would not deplete altruistic donations. Utilizing binary regressions, this paper concludes “students” are more likely to respond to the incentive, relative to non-students.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 18th, 10:00 AM Apr 18th, 11:00 AM

Incentivizing Cadaver Organ Donors

Room C102, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

This article analyzes the use of monetary incentives to increase the supply of cadaver organs in Bloomington, Illinois. The focus is whether a waiver of a driver’s license fee can increase the supply of cadaver donors. In addition, the dynamics of organ donation are addressed and bivariate regressions are utilized to test if being a college student, religion, age, gender, and overall knowledge of donation has any impact on being an organ donor and willingness to accept the monetary incentive. Finally, the concern that a monetary and altruistic market can coexist is addressed in the paper. Utilizing sample z-tests, we discover that a small incentive has a significant impact increasing the number of cadaver organ donors for the studied population and the introduction of the market would not deplete altruistic donations. Utilizing binary regressions, this paper concludes “students” are more likely to respond to the incentive, relative to non-students.