Event Title

Let’s Talk about Sex: Promiscuity, Social Critique, and Tragedy in La Celestina

Graduation Year

2015

Location

Room E101, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

18-4-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

18-4-2015 12:00 PM

Description

Originally published as a work in 16 acts of dialogue in 1499 and republished as a complete 21 act version in 1502, the Tragicomedia de Calisto y Melibea, better known as La Celestina, is a hallmark work of Spanish literature that marks the cultural transition into the Early Modern Age, sometimes called the Siglo de Oro. A converso living in a society of Christian normativity, Fernando de Rojas, author of La Celestina, takes issue with the cultural, religious, and economic homogeneity of the enforced ideals of the newly-united Spain of the Catholic Monarchs in his only literary publication. To arrive at this end, de Rojas makes heavy use of illustrative language in many forms, which, in some cases, leads to both veiled and direct references to sexual activity. The correspondence of these euphemisms with the rising dramatic action of the work links the practice to the futility of the text’s main players. By his use of erotic language and dramatic ends, de Rojas provides acute critique of the increasing homogeneity of Early Modern Spain.

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Apr 18th, 11:00 AM Apr 18th, 12:00 PM

Let’s Talk about Sex: Promiscuity, Social Critique, and Tragedy in La Celestina

Room E101, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Originally published as a work in 16 acts of dialogue in 1499 and republished as a complete 21 act version in 1502, the Tragicomedia de Calisto y Melibea, better known as La Celestina, is a hallmark work of Spanish literature that marks the cultural transition into the Early Modern Age, sometimes called the Siglo de Oro. A converso living in a society of Christian normativity, Fernando de Rojas, author of La Celestina, takes issue with the cultural, religious, and economic homogeneity of the enforced ideals of the newly-united Spain of the Catholic Monarchs in his only literary publication. To arrive at this end, de Rojas makes heavy use of illustrative language in many forms, which, in some cases, leads to both veiled and direct references to sexual activity. The correspondence of these euphemisms with the rising dramatic action of the work links the practice to the futility of the text’s main players. By his use of erotic language and dramatic ends, de Rojas provides acute critique of the increasing homogeneity of Early Modern Spain.