Event Title

Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting

Faculty Advisor

Gabriel Spalding

Graduation Year

2018

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

21-4-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2018 10:00 AM

Description

In this study of quantum optics, we want to extract information associated with quantum mechanically entangled photon pairs. Measurements involved here take advantage of the fact that the photon pairs, created at the same point in space and time, will arrive “in coincidence” at detectors placed equally far from the source. Conservation of momentum also constrains the placement of these detectors. These effects, in combination, allow us to differentiate between these entangled photons and other stray photons that may reach the detectors. Initial efforts have included building a more stable laser mount, studying parametric down conversion (the process of converting the single beam into the entangled photon pairs), and establishing a small time interval for coincidence detection. For this, we explore the consequences of moving away from a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) for coincidence measurements and towards the use of a Programmable System on a Chip (PSoC), which essentially combines the fast digital logic gates of an FPGA with micro-controller functionality. We are gaining hands-on experience with some highly theoretical aspects intrinsic to quantum mechanics, expanding upon laboratory setups described in Mark Beck’s recent text on quantum mechanics, as well as materials from Exploring Quantum Physics through Hands-On Projects by David Prutchi and Shanni R. Prutchi.

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Apr 21st, 9:00 AM Apr 21st, 10:00 AM

Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

In this study of quantum optics, we want to extract information associated with quantum mechanically entangled photon pairs. Measurements involved here take advantage of the fact that the photon pairs, created at the same point in space and time, will arrive “in coincidence” at detectors placed equally far from the source. Conservation of momentum also constrains the placement of these detectors. These effects, in combination, allow us to differentiate between these entangled photons and other stray photons that may reach the detectors. Initial efforts have included building a more stable laser mount, studying parametric down conversion (the process of converting the single beam into the entangled photon pairs), and establishing a small time interval for coincidence detection. For this, we explore the consequences of moving away from a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) for coincidence measurements and towards the use of a Programmable System on a Chip (PSoC), which essentially combines the fast digital logic gates of an FPGA with micro-controller functionality. We are gaining hands-on experience with some highly theoretical aspects intrinsic to quantum mechanics, expanding upon laboratory setups described in Mark Beck’s recent text on quantum mechanics, as well as materials from Exploring Quantum Physics through Hands-On Projects by David Prutchi and Shanni R. Prutchi.