Event Title

Sexual Violence and the State in Armed Conflict

Faculty Advisor

William Munro

Graduation Year

2018

Location

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

21-4-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2018 12:00 PM

Description

Sexual violence against male victims in armed conflict has drawn less attention compared to that against females. Some current scholar works try to attribute the occurrence of such violence to the perpetrator’s desire of asserting their own authority of masculinity. However, claiming that sexual violence against males is perpetrated only to assert personal masculinity fails to explain the attempt of the individual perpetrator to use sexual violence to emasculate a community of the enemy during the war. With analyses of cases from ICTY testimonies, this essay argues that it is the state that embodies the hegemonic, normative masculinity envisioned and also aspired to by the individuals, thus becoming the principal that demands the defense and expansion of this hegemonic masculine authority during the armed conflict. Consequentially, individuals within that state become the subordinate agents tasked with implementing the state’s demand. Failing to recognize the state’s important involvement in contributing the occurrence of sexual violence leads to insufficient understanding of both the occurrence of sexual violence against males, as well as the reluctance, if not utter denial, from the victim’s state to seek reparation on such issue.

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Apr 21st, 11:00 AM Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

Sexual Violence and the State in Armed Conflict

Room E103, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Sexual violence against male victims in armed conflict has drawn less attention compared to that against females. Some current scholar works try to attribute the occurrence of such violence to the perpetrator’s desire of asserting their own authority of masculinity. However, claiming that sexual violence against males is perpetrated only to assert personal masculinity fails to explain the attempt of the individual perpetrator to use sexual violence to emasculate a community of the enemy during the war. With analyses of cases from ICTY testimonies, this essay argues that it is the state that embodies the hegemonic, normative masculinity envisioned and also aspired to by the individuals, thus becoming the principal that demands the defense and expansion of this hegemonic masculine authority during the armed conflict. Consequentially, individuals within that state become the subordinate agents tasked with implementing the state’s demand. Failing to recognize the state’s important involvement in contributing the occurrence of sexual violence leads to insufficient understanding of both the occurrence of sexual violence against males, as well as the reluctance, if not utter denial, from the victim’s state to seek reparation on such issue.