Event Title

Towards Spatial Localization of the Source of High-Energy Particles in the Near-Space Portion of the Atmosphere

Faculty Advisor

Gabriel Spalding

Graduation Year

2018

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

21-4-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2018 10:00 AM

Description

High-altitude balloons measurements show that the rate of detection of high-energy particles reaches a maximum at a certain altitude [1]. We want to gather data of this ‘Pfotzer maximum” and to study the directionality of high-energy particles as altitude changes. Directionality can be studied by looking at “coincident” detection, as particles pass through multiple detectors, in either horizontal or vertical directions. We account for effect due to the sun’s location by conducting experiments at different times of day. This presentation focuses on selection, assembly, and testing of detectors and electronics required for data processing and establishing the (small) time window during which detected particles are considered as “coincident”. During prototyping, we use much less expensive LEDs as inefficient Single-Photon Avalanche Detectors (SPADs), ensuring that our more expensive detectors are safe. Final detectors consist of BC-408 doped scintillators, which emits light to be detected by a silicon photomultiplier chip (Ketek SiPM), following protocols of CosmicWatch. [2] Coincidence detection conditions are established using logic gates on a Programmable System on a Chip (PSoC), which also contains the microprocessor and memory for data logging. Initial tests include detector quenching/dead time, after-pulsing, timing resolution, jitter, etc.

  1. Adams, A, Brauer, E, &Stroman, J , A Small Geiger Counter Array, DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana
  2. Axani, SN, Conrad, JM & Kirby, C 2017, The Desktop Muon Detector: A simple, physics-motivated machine-and electronics-shop project for university students, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Apr 21st, 9:00 AM Apr 21st, 10:00 AM

Towards Spatial Localization of the Source of High-Energy Particles in the Near-Space Portion of the Atmosphere

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

High-altitude balloons measurements show that the rate of detection of high-energy particles reaches a maximum at a certain altitude [1]. We want to gather data of this ‘Pfotzer maximum” and to study the directionality of high-energy particles as altitude changes. Directionality can be studied by looking at “coincident” detection, as particles pass through multiple detectors, in either horizontal or vertical directions. We account for effect due to the sun’s location by conducting experiments at different times of day. This presentation focuses on selection, assembly, and testing of detectors and electronics required for data processing and establishing the (small) time window during which detected particles are considered as “coincident”. During prototyping, we use much less expensive LEDs as inefficient Single-Photon Avalanche Detectors (SPADs), ensuring that our more expensive detectors are safe. Final detectors consist of BC-408 doped scintillators, which emits light to be detected by a silicon photomultiplier chip (Ketek SiPM), following protocols of CosmicWatch. [2] Coincidence detection conditions are established using logic gates on a Programmable System on a Chip (PSoC), which also contains the microprocessor and memory for data logging. Initial tests include detector quenching/dead time, after-pulsing, timing resolution, jitter, etc.

  1. Adams, A, Brauer, E, &Stroman, J , A Small Geiger Counter Array, DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana
  2. Axani, SN, Conrad, JM & Kirby, C 2017, The Desktop Muon Detector: A simple, physics-motivated machine-and electronics-shop project for university students, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.