Event Title

Completion and Testing of an Instrument for Investigating the Terahertz Optical Properties of Cooled Samples

Faculty Advisor

Thushara Perera

Graduation Year

2018

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

21-4-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2018 10:00 AM

Description

Astronomers use terahertz light frequencies to study distant cosmic objects of interest. These objects are often shrouded in vast fields of cosmic dust. We aim to learn about the optical properties of this dust to eventually aid in these observations. The opacity and emissivity of cosmic dust analogs will be studied at terahertz light frequencies and temperatures ranging from 4-30 kelvin. The system (designed and constructed at IWU) includes a dewar/cryocooler for reaching low temperatures, a bolometer to measure light intensities, a black body light source for generating light and a Fourier Transform Spectrometer for breaking the light into its component frequencies. The system was fully built in the spring of 2018 and will be tested in April 2018. This poster presentation will cover the experimental setup and the preliminary results from the “first light” cooldown.

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Apr 21st, 9:00 AM Apr 21st, 10:00 AM

Completion and Testing of an Instrument for Investigating the Terahertz Optical Properties of Cooled Samples

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Astronomers use terahertz light frequencies to study distant cosmic objects of interest. These objects are often shrouded in vast fields of cosmic dust. We aim to learn about the optical properties of this dust to eventually aid in these observations. The opacity and emissivity of cosmic dust analogs will be studied at terahertz light frequencies and temperatures ranging from 4-30 kelvin. The system (designed and constructed at IWU) includes a dewar/cryocooler for reaching low temperatures, a bolometer to measure light intensities, a black body light source for generating light and a Fourier Transform Spectrometer for breaking the light into its component frequencies. The system was fully built in the spring of 2018 and will be tested in April 2018. This poster presentation will cover the experimental setup and the preliminary results from the “first light” cooldown.