Event Title

Electron Detection: Design and Construction

Faculty Advisor

Bruno deHarak

Graduation Year

2021

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

21-4-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2018 10:00 AM

Description

Electrons, miniscule negatively charged elementary particles, are vital in both day to day life and in countless experiments across all STEM disciplines. In our experiment, we are studying what happens to an electron when scattered off of an atom in the presence of a laser field. Being able to detect individual electrons is essential to the experiment. To accomplish this we make use of a channel-electron multiplier (CEM). The addition of wire meshes held at two different voltages allows us to limit detection to those electrons having a particular energy. The use of our CEM requires a circuit powering the CEM while also carrying the signal from detected electrons to an amplifier, allowing the data to be output and processed via computer. This circuit, involving an AC coupler and a preamp, need not be unique to our setup. In fact, it is robust and can be used for any CEM system involved in detection of low voltage signals.

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Apr 21st, 9:00 AM Apr 21st, 10:00 AM

Electron Detection: Design and Construction

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Electrons, miniscule negatively charged elementary particles, are vital in both day to day life and in countless experiments across all STEM disciplines. In our experiment, we are studying what happens to an electron when scattered off of an atom in the presence of a laser field. Being able to detect individual electrons is essential to the experiment. To accomplish this we make use of a channel-electron multiplier (CEM). The addition of wire meshes held at two different voltages allows us to limit detection to those electrons having a particular energy. The use of our CEM requires a circuit powering the CEM while also carrying the signal from detected electrons to an amplifier, allowing the data to be output and processed via computer. This circuit, involving an AC coupler and a preamp, need not be unique to our setup. In fact, it is robust and can be used for any CEM system involved in detection of low voltage signals.