Event Title

Teaching Adult ESL Learners as Community Leaders

Faculty Advisor

Teddy Amoloza

Faculty Advisor

Leah Nillas

Graduation Year

2019

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

21-4-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2018 3:00 PM

Description

During my internship at EarthRights International School in Chiang Mai, Thailand, I was introduced to new methods of teaching based on Paolo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed. This approach to teaching and learning condemns conventional “banking” learning, learning that occurs one-way from teachers to students, and promotes learning that engages and transforms students into active, autonomous learners. Applying this new approach into teaching ESL adult learners, I faced challenges with the change in method. The transition from conventional methods was difficult for the students, and at times they felt unmotivated because there was no definite answer or solution given to them. I will talk more in-depth about the challenges and how I overcame them by incorporating what I learned from Freire’s method and other multicultural teaching techniques. Furthermore, through working with the students, it became clear why students were motivated to choose an English program, and why English was an important tool to pursue human and environmental rights activism in their communities.

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Apr 21st, 2:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

Teaching Adult ESL Learners as Community Leaders

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

During my internship at EarthRights International School in Chiang Mai, Thailand, I was introduced to new methods of teaching based on Paolo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed. This approach to teaching and learning condemns conventional “banking” learning, learning that occurs one-way from teachers to students, and promotes learning that engages and transforms students into active, autonomous learners. Applying this new approach into teaching ESL adult learners, I faced challenges with the change in method. The transition from conventional methods was difficult for the students, and at times they felt unmotivated because there was no definite answer or solution given to them. I will talk more in-depth about the challenges and how I overcame them by incorporating what I learned from Freire’s method and other multicultural teaching techniques. Furthermore, through working with the students, it became clear why students were motivated to choose an English program, and why English was an important tool to pursue human and environmental rights activism in their communities.