Event Title

Comparison of Clearance Rates Between Two Rotifer Species (Asplanchna priodonta and Conochilus unicornis) Based on Particle Characteristics

Faculty Advisor

William Jaeckle

Graduation Year

2018

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

21-4-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2018 3:00 PM

Description

Rotifers are microscopic, aquatic invertebrates which use two bands of cilia, collectively the corona, to concentrate and capture particulate foods. The manner in which rotifers use the corona to capture food and the size of food ingested can differ markedly amoung species. We compared the ability of colonial (Conochilus unicornis) and solitary (Asplanchna priodonta) rotifers to clear polystyrene beads (0.75 µm) and fluorescently-labeled bacteria (Roseobacter sp., 1.23 µm) from water (µL / hour). For C. unicornis, at a concentration of 5 × 105 particles / mL, the average clearance rate of polystyrene beads (2.73 ± 4.71× 10-3 µL / hour, mean ± SE) was significantly larger (F(1,5)= 10,308, p = 1.76 × 10-9) than that of bacteria (8.16 × 10-3 ± 1.4 × 10-3 µL / hour). Similarly, when incubated with 1 × 106 particles / mL, the average clearance rate of polystyrene beads (3.35 × 10-2 ± 6.18 × 10-3 µL / hour) by A. priodonta was significantly greater (F(1,9) = 77.48, p = 1 × 10-5) than fluorescently-labeled bacteria (3.23 × 10-3± 2.40 × 10-4 µL / hour). The average clearance rate of polystyrene beads at 5 × 105 particles / mL for C. unicornis was significantly larger (F(1,39) = 913.7, p = 1.18 × 10-28) than the average clearance rate for A. priodonta, suggesting that the two species feed on particles of different size.

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Apr 21st, 2:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

Comparison of Clearance Rates Between Two Rotifer Species (Asplanchna priodonta and Conochilus unicornis) Based on Particle Characteristics

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Rotifers are microscopic, aquatic invertebrates which use two bands of cilia, collectively the corona, to concentrate and capture particulate foods. The manner in which rotifers use the corona to capture food and the size of food ingested can differ markedly amoung species. We compared the ability of colonial (Conochilus unicornis) and solitary (Asplanchna priodonta) rotifers to clear polystyrene beads (0.75 µm) and fluorescently-labeled bacteria (Roseobacter sp., 1.23 µm) from water (µL / hour). For C. unicornis, at a concentration of 5 × 105 particles / mL, the average clearance rate of polystyrene beads (2.73 ± 4.71× 10-3 µL / hour, mean ± SE) was significantly larger (F(1,5)= 10,308, p = 1.76 × 10-9) than that of bacteria (8.16 × 10-3 ± 1.4 × 10-3 µL / hour). Similarly, when incubated with 1 × 106 particles / mL, the average clearance rate of polystyrene beads (3.35 × 10-2 ± 6.18 × 10-3 µL / hour) by A. priodonta was significantly greater (F(1,9) = 77.48, p = 1 × 10-5) than fluorescently-labeled bacteria (3.23 × 10-3± 2.40 × 10-4 µL / hour). The average clearance rate of polystyrene beads at 5 × 105 particles / mL for C. unicornis was significantly larger (F(1,39) = 913.7, p = 1.18 × 10-28) than the average clearance rate for A. priodonta, suggesting that the two species feed on particles of different size.