Event Title

Examination Of The Role Of FGF Signaling During The Development Of The Lower Jaw Cartilages In Moenkhausia Sanctaefilomenae

Faculty Advisor

Brian Walter

Graduation Year

2019

Location

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

21-4-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2018 3:00 PM

Description

The FGF signaling pathway is known to influence the formation of the craniofacial cartilages early in development. To determine if FGF signaling plays a role in regulating cell division patterns in the redeye tetra Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae, we conducted pulse-chase experiments with 24-36 hpf treated specimens using the inhibitor SU5402 then chased to 100 hpf. Specimens were simultaneously treated with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells and monitor the effects the inhibitor had on the number of labeled cells. Results showed clear reduction in cartilage from those treated with FGF inhibitor. Using immunohistochemistry, we found that the cartilages of the SU5402 treated specimens still tested positive for BrdU, indicating that FGF may not play a major role during cell division of the time frame we observed. Overall, these data suggest that FGF does not play a major role for cell division but may be influential in another aspect of cartilage development.

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Apr 21st, 2:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

Examination Of The Role Of FGF Signaling During The Development Of The Lower Jaw Cartilages In Moenkhausia Sanctaefilomenae

Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

The FGF signaling pathway is known to influence the formation of the craniofacial cartilages early in development. To determine if FGF signaling plays a role in regulating cell division patterns in the redeye tetra Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae, we conducted pulse-chase experiments with 24-36 hpf treated specimens using the inhibitor SU5402 then chased to 100 hpf. Specimens were simultaneously treated with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells and monitor the effects the inhibitor had on the number of labeled cells. Results showed clear reduction in cartilage from those treated with FGF inhibitor. Using immunohistochemistry, we found that the cartilages of the SU5402 treated specimens still tested positive for BrdU, indicating that FGF may not play a major role during cell division of the time frame we observed. Overall, these data suggest that FGF does not play a major role for cell division but may be influential in another aspect of cartilage development.