Event Title

A New Terrestrial-Breeding Frog (Strabomantidae: Pristimantis) From Northern Peru

Faculty Advisor

Edgar Lehr

Graduation Year

2019

Location

Room E105, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Start Date

13-4-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

13-4-2019 12:00 PM

Description

Nearly 700 species belong to Strabomantidae, a family of terrestrial-breeding, small to medium sized frogs. Of these, 516 are of the genus Pristimantis. A series of frogs collected during an expedition in a montane forest between 2843 and 3013 m elevation in the Region Lambayeque contained a new species of frog of the genus Pristimantis. This frog has female snout–vent lengths (= SVL) between 24.2–26.1 mm (n = 4) and male SVL between 17.2–18.7 mm (n = 2), and a coloration from pale brown to dark brown. It differs from its congeners by having males without vocal slits and nuptial pads, ulnar tubercles fused to a ridge, and fingers and toes with narrowly rounded discs. The new species is morphologically most similar to Pristimantis chimu, from which it differs by lacking a cranial crest and tarsal tubercles, and genetically most similar to P. simonsii and P. cryophilius.

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Apr 13th, 11:00 AM Apr 13th, 12:00 PM

A New Terrestrial-Breeding Frog (Strabomantidae: Pristimantis) From Northern Peru

Room E105, Center for Natural Sciences, Illinois Wesleyan University

Nearly 700 species belong to Strabomantidae, a family of terrestrial-breeding, small to medium sized frogs. Of these, 516 are of the genus Pristimantis. A series of frogs collected during an expedition in a montane forest between 2843 and 3013 m elevation in the Region Lambayeque contained a new species of frog of the genus Pristimantis. This frog has female snout–vent lengths (= SVL) between 24.2–26.1 mm (n = 4) and male SVL between 17.2–18.7 mm (n = 2), and a coloration from pale brown to dark brown. It differs from its congeners by having males without vocal slits and nuptial pads, ulnar tubercles fused to a ridge, and fingers and toes with narrowly rounded discs. The new species is morphologically most similar to Pristimantis chimu, from which it differs by lacking a cranial crest and tarsal tubercles, and genetically most similar to P. simonsii and P. cryophilius.